Cocaine Stats

However, they cite a study performed by the Substance Abuse and Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that showed that although cocaine use declined until the early 1990s, cocaine use has been rising in the United States ever since.

Further, it is estimated that between 22 and 25 million people have used cocaine at least once, and about two million people struggle with cocaine addiction in the United States. Also, according to the Office of National Drug Control Policy (part of the Executive Office of the President of the United States), among those 12 and older, about 0.7 percent of the population used cocaine – including crack cocaine – in the past month. This might not seem like a huge statistic but, shockingly, 0.7% of the population translates to over a million new users a year.

Also, studies by SAMHSA show that those who most commonly use cocaine are adults. In the 1980’s most users were at least 18 and now they are generally at least 21 years old. cocaineabuse.us further indicates that drug-statistics.com reports that college students use of cocaine is on the rise – up to 4.8 percent from 2 percent in 1994. Interestingly, men are more likely to use cocaine than are women. But recently, it has been shown that the gap between male and female users is narrowing. Tragically, more than 400,000 infants are born addicted to cocaine each year in the United States.

It is clear that although cocaine use declined after the 1980’s, it is once again on the rise and should not be ignored as an addiction problem that could very negatively impact our society.

Sources: drugabuse.gov, cocaineabuse.us

Cocaine

What are there signs of cocaine use? Have you wondered if someone you love is using cocaine? Cocaine is a very popular drug known for its quick rush and production of energy. Users may suddenly seem excited and act more confident or just have a better sense of well-being. Disappearing for a minute (even for just a quick bathroom break) and then returning in a very different mood can be a sign of someone using cocaine. They may be more talkative, sexually excited, and more energetic overall after using. If individuals are using cocaine, they generally won’t have an appetite for food and their sleep pattern will be irregular.

Another obvious sign of cocaine use is small traces of white powder around a person’s nose. However, while many people snort cocaine, thus leaving the powder, some will dissolve and inject or ingest it. Further, if an individual’s eyes are dilated and the pupils are overly sensitive to light or they have runny noses and/or nosebleeds (due to damage to the inside of the nose) cocaine use may be present. Some other things to look for if cocaine use is suspected are needle marks on arms, legs, hands, feet or neck and discarded syringes left around the place cocaine was consumed. Also, due to the short lasting nature of cocaine, users may leave periodically so they can use more cocaine.

Top Ten Most Abused Drugs of 2017

As the year 2017 comes to an end, many studies show a clear list of the top ten drugs abused this year. Sadly, many individuals continue to struggle with addiction to these drugs. But, on a brighter note, several individuals have overcome their addictions this year or are on their way to doing so in recovery. Hopefully, 2018 will bring even more success for the many individuals who fight against addictions to these top ten powerful drugs.

The top ten list of most abused illegal drugs in 2017 is as follows:

1-Crack Cocaine

2-Heroin

3-Methamphetamine

4-Bath Salts

5-Cocaine

6-Amphetamines

7-Methadone

8-Benzodiazepines

9-Ecstasy

10-Marijuana

In the coming weeks, watch for more in-depth descriptions of these top ten most abused drugs of 2017 on this site.

Sources:

https://www.drugabuse.gov/drugs-abuse/commonly-abused-drugs-charts

https://www.drugabuse.gov/drugs-abuse

https://medlineplus.gov/drugabuse.html

Cocaine Statistics 

Back in the 1980’s we often heard about cocaine use and abuse but now it seems we hear more about heroin/opioids. However, although many people believe that cocaine is not a major threat like it used to be when cocaine use peaked in the 80’s, recent show that cocaine use is on the rise again.

For instance, a study performed by the Substance Abuse and Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) showed that although cocaine use declined until the early 1990s, cocaine use has been rising in the United States since. Also, it is estimated that about two million people are cocaine addicts in the United States, and that between 22 and 25 million people have used cocaine at least once. Also, according to the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), about 0.7 percent of the population in the US aged 12 and older used cocaine – including crack cocaine – in the past month. Although 0.7 might seem like a small amount of the population, it translates to over a million new users a year.

New reports also indicate that cocaine users used to be closer to 18 and now are more college aged – closer to 21 on average. Cocaineabuse.us indicates that drug-statistics.com reports that college students have been increasing their use of cocaine – up to 4.8 percent from 2 percent in 1994. Also noteworthy is the fact that men are more likely to use cocaine than are women. However, more and more females are being reported as abusing cocaine. In fact, more than 400,000 infants are born addicted to cocaine each year in the United States.

Another interesting fact is that the rate of cocaine use is found according to racial lines. The most common group of cocaine abusers is American Indians and/or Alaskan natives. Their rate of cocaine use is about 2 percent. Other cocaine use rates include 1.6 percent for African Americans, 0.8 percent for Caucasians, 0.8 percent for Hispanics, 0.6 percent for Pacific Islanders and/or Native Hawaiians and 0.2 percent for Asians. As a result, some agency resources are being concentrated in areas where certain races reside and cocaine use is higher. (cocaineabuse.us)

The good news comes from the younger generation. That is to say that cocaine abuse among high school students is actually down from where it once was. Recent studies indicate that high school sophomores are using cocaine less. Again, cocaineabuse.us states that the, “NIDA reports that past-year use of crack cocaine decreased in 10th graders from 2.3 percent to 1.6 percent. This is encouraging, and it is hopeful that today’s teenagers will continue to avoid cocaine even after they reach the 18-25 age group. Sadly, however, there is speculation that the decline in cocaine use among today’s teens has less to do with the anti-drug campaigns, etc. and more to do with the inexpensive availability of prescription drugs.

Statistics and studies show that while opioid use is a definite concern and factor in today’s “anti-drug” campaigns, cocaine use is once again on the rise and should not be ignored.

cocaineeffectsDangerous Cocaine Effects

A new study, from Johns Hopkins University recently published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that high doses of cocaine causes brain cells to kill themselves in mice. The researchers found that cocaine can kill brain cells by triggering “overactive autophagy,” which can be defined as the process by which cells digest their own insides. Further, this process was seen in the brains of mice whose mothers were given cocaine while pregnant.

The study looked at nerve cells in the brains of mice and saw that the cells of the mice that had been exposed to cocaine literally “committed suicide” in different ways that are known that are chemically programmed into the cell. This process of autophagy happens in healthy cells as a method of cleaning up – getting rid of debris within the membrane contained bags within the cell. When these membrane filled bags join with other bags that are filled with the acid from cocaine, the contents of the bags are destroyed. While this autophagic process doesn’t normally cause cell death, when it occurs frequently and accelerates, the cell ends up eating itself.

Although the findings were frightening, positive findings were prevalent as well due to the fact that researchers feel that in the future they can develop drugs that can prevent autophagy and save the cells before the cocaine causes them to kill themselves.

 

 

cocaine cutting drugs addictionIs Smoking Nicotine a Gateway for Cocaine Use?

Many individuals smoke nicotine, it’s legal after all. But does smoking nicotine become a gateway for cocaine addiction?   New research indicates that this may be the case: nicotine and cocaine alter the brain’s dopamine levels in very similar ways. Reports indicate that the ongoing presence of nicotine often makes the brain more susceptible to the effects of cocaine and prepares the ground for cocaine addiction.

Almost every substance that could possibly trigger physical dependence and addiction achieves its basic effects by artificially hiking levels of dopamine inside the brain. Some substances increase dopamine levels by directly accumulating dopamine output in certain neurons; while others hike dopamine levels by blocking the recycling process that normally breaks the chemical down into parts. Also, some substances significantly increase dopamine levels by engaging in both of these activities simultaneously. It is interesting to note that nicotine, cocaine, and other addictive substances similarly alter the levels of dopamine and other neurotransmitters by either blocking normal activity at neuron receptor sites or mimicking neurotransmitters and plugging into those receptor sites.

A recent study published in 2011 in the Journal of Neuroscience, indicates that a single cigarette releases enough nicotine into the body to trigger dopamine increases that can last for several days. The study shows that over time, repeated smoking of nicotine can lead to two important alterations in specific brain regions. The first of these changes is increased dopamine levels which produce the pleasurable sensations that begin a smoker down the path to addiction. Also, the presence of nicotine can alter memory and learning, encouraging a pattern of learned behavior that supports smoking in the future. Importantly, the study also shows that nicotine achieves part of its effects by chemically activating the same dopamine receptors that get activated by cocaine.

Most people begin with smoking nicotine and then later begin abusing cocaine. Many doctors and researchers used to consider this to be a useless piece of information: common knowledge they may say. But, a new study by the Journal Science Translational Medicine published in 2012, says that the long-term presence of nicotine in the brain essentially strengthens the brain’s response to cocaine. This intensified response to cocaine by the brain means that those who “try” cocaine will more likely become addicted to using it. Importantly, the study also reports that while smoking increases the risks for cocaine abuse and addiction, cocaine abuse and addiction do not increase the risks for smoking.

cocaine cutting drugs addictionSome interesting facts about Cocaine

Cocaine is a strong stimulate that affects the body’s central nervous system.  Cocaine is a white crystalline powder that is often mixed with sugar, cornstarch, vitamins and/or flour. Crack cocaine looks like a small rock, chunk or chip and it is sometimes off-white or pink in color.  Common names for cocaine include: coke, dust, toot, line, nose candy, snow, sneeze, powder, girl, white pony, flake, C, the lady, Cain, neuro-Cain, rock, or crack.  But, it’s all cocaine: a powerfully addictive pain blocker extracted from the leaves of Erythroxylon coca, a plant that comes from the Andean highlands in South America.

Users of cocaine generally take it into their systems in three different ways.  It can be injected (released directly into the bloodstream), smoked (inhaled as vapor or smoke into the lungs, where it rapidly enters the bloodstream), or snorted (inhaled through the nose enter the bloodstream through nasal tissues).  Interestingly, it is the second most commonly used illicit drug in the U.S.  In fact, nearly one percent of Americans, or 2.1 million people, are currently using cocaine. Users come from all economic status, all ages and all genders.

Cocaine poses a threat to Utah, particularly because of the violence associated with the distribution and abuse of the drug. Powdered cocaine is distributed in both wholesale and retail quantities and is available throughout the state. Crack cocaine is available only in retail quantities and only in metropolitan areas. Mexican criminal groups transport powdered cocaine into the state and serve as wholesale, midlevel, and retail distributors. At the retail level street gangs and Caucasian and Mexican local independent dealers distribute powdered cocaine. Some street gangs also convert powdered cocaine into crack and distribute the drug at the wholesale and retail levels. (National Drug Intelligence Center, Utah Drug Threat Assessment)

Cocaine is very addictive and leaves users with an overwhelming craving for the drug. The addiction to cocaine develops quickly, sometimes after just a few times of smoking/snorting/injecting it. Those addicted to cocaine or crack can find help in behavioral treatment including both residential and outpatient approaches.

medicalnewstoday.com

drugcravingWithout drug cravings, drug addictions would be lessened significantly.  The craving obviously perpetuates the addiction and the abuse that occurs with drug use.  Drug cravings can be physical or psychological. Physical drug cravings happen when a drug dependent person builds up their tolerance to a drug or drugs over time. Drug cravings, like other physical cravings, are taken as a symbol that the individual should give the body what it thinks it needs.

Drug cravings are very powerful and compel many people to use drugs. Even though the cravings may seem like they are uncontrollable, they can be controlled and one does not have to act upon such cravings. When a person is in a drug recovery program, they can learn to tolerate cravings and not act upon them. Then, many are in a good position to start taking back control of their lives.

If someone has never been addicted to drugs, it might be difficult to understand addictive cravings. To understand this, they might imagine that they have gone a very long time without eating. They are extremely hungry, even faint and weak. The hunger has been going on way too long and they can’t focus on anything else.  When someone is that hungry, very often all they can do is think about and crave their favorite foods. They might even be able to smell and taste that succulent burger or steak, or the sharp, fresh taste of berries blended with sweet whipped cream.

If they get hungry enough, nothing can stop them from running to get food, especially if it were available. As soon as they consumed that wonderful food they’d been thinking about so passionately and craving, they’d feel completely satisfied. (narconon.org)

Drugs that are addictive activate the brain’s reward systems. The promise of reward is very intense, which in turn causes drug cravings. These intense drug cravings force the addict to focus his or her activities around taking the drug.

An addicted person experiencing drug cravings will feel like life itself is dependent on getting and consuming whatever substance is causing those cravings. They will feel justified in saying or doing whatever it takes to feel that satisfaction and relief. But that relief will only last until that drug starts to wear off, which might just be a few hours or might be a day.

“The more an individual use drugs and alcohol, the guiltier they will feel, and the more depressed they will become. They will sacrifice their personal integrity, relationships with friends and family, their job, their savings, and anything else they may have in an attempt to get more drugs to satisfy the intense drug cravings. The drugs are now the most important things in their life. Their relationships and job performance will go drastically downhill.” (drug-rehabs.org)

Drug cravings are very powerful and make it extremely difficult to overcome drug addiction.

cocaineSome interesting statistics about cocaine use:

Cocaineabuse.us offer some interesting recent information about cocaine statistics and users.  They indicate that many people believe that cocaine is not a major threat like it used to be when cocaine use peaked in the 80’s.

However, they cite that a study performed by the Substance Abuse and Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that showed that although cocaine use declined until the early 1990s,cocaine use has been rising in the United States since.

Further, it is estimated that about two million people are cocaine addicts in the United States, and that between 22 and 25 million people have used cocaine at least once.

Also, according to the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), part of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, among those 12 and older, about 0.7 percent of the population used cocaine – including crack cocaine – in the past month. This might not seem like a huge statistic.  However, 0.7 percent of the population translates to over a million new users a year!

It has been shown by SAMHSA that adults most commonly use cocaine. In the 1980’s most users were at least 18 and now they are generally at least 21 years old. Cocaineabuse.us indicates that drug-statistics.com reports that college students have been increasing their use of cocaine – up to 4.8 percent from 2 percent in 1994.

Interestingly, men are more likely to use cocaine than are women.  But recently, it has been sown that the gap between male and female users is narrowing. Tragically, more than 400,000 infants are born addicted to cocaine each year in the United States.

There is good news, however.  Recent studies indicate that high school sophomores are using cocaine less. Again, cocaineabuse.us states that the, “NIDA reports that past-year use of crack cocaine decreased in 10th graders from 2.3 percent to 1.6 percent. This is encouraging, and it is hopeful that today’s teenagers will continue to avoid cocaine even after they reach the 18-25 age group. There is speculation that the decline in cocaine use among teenagers is more to do with the inexpensive availability of prescription drugs.”

Interesting to note is the cocaine use found according to racial lines. The most common group of cocaine abusers is American Indians and/or Alaskan natives. Their rate of cocaine use is about 2 percent. Other cocaine use rates include 1.6 percent for African Americans, 0.8 percent for Caucasians, 0.8 percent for Hispanics, 0.6 percent for Pacific Islanders and/or Native Hawaiians and 0.2 percent for Asians. As a result, some agency resources are being concentrated in areas where certain races reside and cocaine use is higher. (cocaineabuse.us)

It is clear that although cocaine use declined after the 1980’s, it is once again on the rise and should not be ignored as an addicting problem that could very negatively impact our society.
 

whatiscocaineWhat is cocaine?

Although you may have heard it called coke, dust, toot, line, nose candy, snow, sneeze, powder, girl, white pony, flake, C, the lady, Cain, neuro-Cain, rock, or crack, it’s all cocaine: a powerfully addictive pain blocker extracted from the leaves of Erythroxylon coca, a plant that comes from the Andean highlands in South America. Cocaine is a strong stimulate that affects the body’s central nervous system.  It’s a white crystalline powder that is often mixed with sugar, cornstarch, vitamins and/or flour. Crack cocaine looks like a small rock, chunk or chip and it is sometimes off-white or pink in color.

Cocaine can be injected (released directly into the bloodstream), smoked (inhaled as vapor or smoke into the lungs, where it rapidly enters the bloodstream), or snorted (inhaled through the nose enter the bloodstream through nasal tissues).  It is the second most commonly used illicit drug in the U.S.  Nearly one percent of Americans, or 2.1 million people, are currently using cocaine. Users can be from all economic status, all ages and all genders.

Cocaine is highly addictive, leaving users with an overwhelming craving for the drug. The addiction to crack develops quickly, sometimes after just a few times of smoking it. Those addicted to cocaine or crack can find help in behavioral treatment including both residential and outpatient approaches.

medicalnewstoday.com

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